News

 

Study of Immune Protein Could Help Fight Tuberculosis, Other Pathogens

Scientists at UT Austin have revealed how a protein called ISG15 helps the human immune system fight certain pathogens, including the microbe that causes tuberculosis. In 2012, the group was part of a study that demonstrated that ISG15 stimulates the release of a cytokine, Interferon-g, important in the response to pathogenic bacteria. With this latest work, published this week in the journal Molecular Cell, these scientists have identified the cell surface receptor for ISG15 and determined the initial steps in how it activates the secretion of a range of cytokines.

Jon Huibregtse, UT Austin professor of molecular biosciences who led the study, said this may provide new insights into how to modulate immune responses and treat microbial infections.

“We think we may be on the trail of an entirely new mechanism for stimulating cytokine secretion,” said Huibregtse, “and that this might have implications for a wide variety of infectious diseases.”

Read the paper: Extracellular ISG15 Signals Cytokine Secretion through the LFA-1 Integrin Receptor

Fall 2017 Letter from the Chair

What better example is there of how “What Starts Here Changes the World” than the legacy of our UT Austin alumni? This fall, the College of Natural Sciences inducted into its Hall of Honor alumna Gail Dianne Lewis, who has done life-saving research with Genentech to produce effective new treatments for patients with the aggressive HER2-positive form of breast cancer. Another alum, celebrated immunotherapy pioneer Dr. James Allison, made TIME magazine’s list of the world’s most influential people and was inducted into the American Academy of Arts & Sciences this year. Capping it all, the 2017 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was recently shared by our alum Michael Young for discovering the molecular circuits underlying circadian rhythms.

A revolution in human health is coming about not only because of our alumni, but through ongoing efforts at The University of Texas at Austin. The groundbreaking work our researchers are doing, increasingly in coordination with faculty in the Dell Medical School, is ushering in a new era of biomedical research and education on campus. You’ll find evidence of it with our outstanding new faculty members, our exciting new cryo-electron microscopy facility, and our remarkable graduate students and undergraduates. Your support for the outstanding research and amazing people in our Texas Molecular Biosciences community ensures that the “What Starts Here…” legacy continues for generations to come. More news from the Department is here and on the College website. Please consider a gift to help support our work.

Daniel Leahy
Chair, Department of Molecular Biosciences

 

New MBS Faculty Member Receives Etter Early Career Award

mclellanJason McLellan, future associate professor in the Department of Molecular Biosciences, has received the Etter Early Career Award from the American Crystallographic Association.

The Etter Early Career award, which was established in 2002, seeks to recognize outstanding achievement and exceptional potential in crystallographic research demonstrated by a scientist at an early stage of their independent career.

McLellan’s research focuses on applying structural information to the rational design of interventions for viruses, specifically the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly every child in the US catches RSV, a virus that infects the lungs and respiratory tract, by the age of two.

He has been working to develop a monoclonal antibody, a type of antibody that targets only one specific protein, which could act as a vaccine surrogate to prevent severe RSV in infants.

McLellan, who is currently an assistant professor at Dartmouth College, will join the UT Austin faculty in January 2018.

Jonghwan Kim Receives Grant to Study Preterm Births

The Burroughs Wellcome Fund has awarded Jonghwan Kim, an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Biosciences at The University of Texas at Austin, a four-year, $600,000 grant to study the biological complexities of preterm birth.

Surprisingly, little is known about the biological mechanisms that occur during birth.  Even less is known about what causes preterm birth.  Defined as babies born before 37 weeks, preterm birth occurs in nearly 13 percent of all U.S births, with African-Americans and Hispanics having an even higher rate.

Preterm Birth is a major public health problem. Many preterm births lead to long-term health problems and developmental difficulties. There are also the sociological issues of families going bankrupt and marriages dissolving.

Kim’s research project is titled “Identifying genetic factors controlling normal and abnormal placental development.”

Burroughs Wellcome Fund’s ultimate goal is to help develop preventive strategies by enabling interdisciplinary teams to collaborate in learning more about preterm birth.

Fall 2016 Letter from the Chair

Dear Friends of UT Molecular Biosciences,​

This fall, UT Austin welcomed its largest incoming class to date, and we are excited to have many of these new Longhorns in the Department of Molecular Biosciences. We welcomed a new faculty member who has done groundbreaking research in CRISPR gene-editing and are preparing a new research facility that allows scientists to see the inner workings of cells at higher resolution than ever before. We also are celebrating Professor John Wallingford's election as president of the Society for Developmental Biology and the achievements of our alumnus, Dr. Jim Allison, who The New York Times featured prominently for his leadership in immunotherapy cancer treatment. We are thankful for your continued support. You're essential in making UT Austin a science education leader and a hub for discovery and innovation that changes the world.


Dan Leahy
Chair, Department of Molecular Biosciences

P.S. Giving from alumni, parents, and friends allows us to pursue strategic initiatives and to support our faculty and students in their education and research endeavors. Please consider making a gift to UT Molecular Biosciences today.